multi-disciplinary artist & futures designer
        




   

Foresensing Futures




Dear reader,

Just out of curiosity… are you comfortable with the unknown?

Our world is on fire and we can't see behind the flames. But can you imagine that the new world already exists, behind the veil of our collective ignorance? There, beyond what your senses are capable to perceive and your mind is prepared to comprehend, exists a world where plurality, community, embodied ethics, a celebration of all of life, environmental awareness, spirituality, and creativity are the norm.

For that future to be pulled into the present moment though, our senses have to re-learn how to see, hear, touch, smell and taste; and beyond, to feel the many dimensions of reality that our minds can’t comprehend but that we can be aware of as we can foresense them. This is where I make an appeal to raise your ancient compass from the dust, and choose it as the navigation system of choice, the intuition: the ability to foresense. The ability to say with confidence: “Something told me that this was going to happen.”

But are you ready? Ready to source from the unknown?

I.


The following story is a powerful illumination of our transition into an unknown future. Whether it be death, life, resurrection or an upgrade in our experience. It helps us remember that all of us went through a fantastic metamorphosis before we even arrived on this planet.


PAINTING BY RAYMOND DOUILLET

Inside the Womb

In a mother’s womb were two babies. One asked the other:

“Do you believe in life after delivery?” The other replies, “Why, of course. There has to be something after delivery. Maybe we are here to prepare ourselves for what we will be later.” “Nonsense,” says the other. “There is no life after delivery. What would that life be?” “I don’t know, but there will be more light than here. Maybe we will walk with our legs and eat from our mouths.” The other says “This is absurd! Walking is impossible. And eat with our mouths? Ridiculous. The umbilical cord supplies nutrition. Life after delivery is to be excluded. The umbilical cord is too short.” “I think there is something and maybe it’s different than it is here.” The other replies, “No one has ever come back from there. Delivery is the end of life, and in the after-delivery it is nothing but darkness and anxiety and it takes us nowhere.” “Well, I don’t know,” says the other, “but certainly we will see mother and she will take care of us.” “Mother?? You believe in mother? Where is she now?” “She is all around us. It is in her that we live. Without her there would not be this world.” “I don’t see her, so it’s only logical that she doesn’t exist.” To which the other replied, “Sometimes when you’re in silence you can hear her, you can perceive her. I believe there is a reality after delivery and we are here to prepare ourselves for that reality.”

RABBI Y. M. TUCKACHINSKY — SOURCE, via DOP
 

II .


It is our hunch of what is true, the ability to foresense, that is navigating our bodyminds through chaos.

If we don’t have the capacity to understand, if there is simply too much going on that is too complex, we have to trust our gut and heart and make a hunch of what is the best path. It is this that HARARI, who studied humanity in all its grudges and glory advises us to train: “I think the most important thing is to invest in emotional intelligence and mental balance, because the hardest challenges will be psychological. Even if there is a new job, and even if you get support from the government to kind of retrain yourself, you need a lot of mental flexibility to manage these transitions.” SOURCE

And so, by telling stories, sometimes uncomfortable, sometimes powerfully pleasant, we can provoke people’s confidence in their ability to foresense, as it is the most powerful tool to navigate change with grace. Foresensing is not only the ability to feel truth, or to imagine new possibility. It is also the ability to be silent, present, and perceive the new world. And for that we have to embody a deeper reality, a reality that is constantly oscillating, ebbing and flowing. We have to “turn on, tune in and drop out.”

III.


Turn on, Tune in and Drop out

This was a big phrase by Timothy Leary in the 1960s, as young people turned away from the corporate conformity of the 1950s and decided that they wanted more out of life than being a number in a big machine.

It has been interpreted more times than you can count, so I would like to add one and reframe it for the era of algorithmic absorption: meaning, the temptation of modern technology to suck all of our attention into the interconnected void of an algorithmic agent.

As, we can only foresense, source the unknown, if we don’t forget about the body, and become aware of the many layers of consciousness that exist beyond our sensory perception.

And so the process of foresensing goes something like this:

“TURN ON” means to go within to activate your bodymind operating system, your neural and genetic equipment. To become sensitive to the many and various levels of consciousness and the specific triggers that engage them.

“TUNE IN” means to interact harmoniously with the world around you, to find ways to experientialize new internal perspectives, to externalize and materialize your visions so that they become available for others.

“DROP OUT” means to self-rely, to discover one’s polysingularity, to make a commitment to flexibility, to source the unknown, and to change.

Of course, all stories and manifestos of deep social resurrections are permeable to ethics, morals and the potential to fail. In this ‘space in between’, where the new world has not appeared and the old is not dead, that is where we choose to reside as a conscious agent. Here it is important to note that our capacity to foresense does not claim truth. It helps us to breathe air into a new reality, bridging the natural and technological, the hope and the despair, the history and the future.

To know the world is to know how we can influence it by tuning into our perception of it. Foresensing is to embrace change, to source from the unknown, and to love ambiguity as a crucial attitude to developing prosperous and resilient ways of living and being.

Yours truly,

Lisanne
___

send me a letter in return.
(2020)